_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
.
.
.
© 2007-2010  moderndallas.net. - all rights reserved.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Berman is a contemporary master of the still life. Still lifes (not lives I assure you)
traditionally depict realistically mostly inanimate subject matter, typically
commonplace objects such as a bouquet of flowers, a wine bottle, a variety
of vegetables and bowls of fruit in a setup setting with limited perspective.
This popular form of composition dates from the adornment of the interiors of
ancient Egyptian tombs past such Modern Masters such as Matisse, Picasso,
Van Gogh and Braque in periods from Impressionism to Cubism to the present.
moderndallas.net
Special “Eye” to Watch
June Mattingly // contributing art writer

Ellen Berman

Austin artist Ellen Berman’s art education includes a BA from the University of Texas in Austin
followed by an MFA from the University of Houston. She’s had one persons lately at the
McMurtrey in Houston and Adair Margo in El Paso who also represent her work and at
Diverse Works, the Austin Museum of Art and the Beeville Art Museum. Through July 24
her work is featured at Conduit Gallery in Dallas
"Square Jar," 2010, oil on board, 12 X 12 inches
Berman plays with similar interrelating design elements only her simplified
compositions, detailed brush work, purposeful reflections, glowing color
harmonies and tonal values are uniquely her personal representational style.
"Three-Quarter Melon, " 2010, oil on board, 18 X 30 inches
Conduit Gallery
1626 C Hi Line Dr, Dallas TX 75207
214.939.0064
www.conduitgallery.com

Three Red Plums, 2010, oil on panel, 12x12"
Frida Kahlo ‘s still lifes of the 1930s, such as “Tunas,” 1938 “in which three prickly
pears that resemble extracted hearts… against a tablecloth whose folds
become an unruly sky” were influential in her work. “I think that almost all
women artists say she was important to them, because of her guts, her
determination, and her success.” It’s hard to disagree with that, Mrs. Berman!  

please support
our charities

receive moderndallas.weekly
email: