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moderndallas.net
Special “Eye” to Watch
June Mattingly // contributing art writer

“Geometric Interpretations: Works Using Paper”
at the Museum of Geometric and MADI Art
through September 26

This invitational group show by artists living in the Dallas-Fort Worth area is a microcosm of
individualistic interpretations of geometric art heightened by being limited to primarily
working with paper.
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Mediums as diverse as graphics, pen and ink, pastels, computer art, collage and
watercolor  create artworks as distant apart in form as origami, jewelry and wall
sculpture yet because of the abstract theme it looks quite striking and interconnected
when installed all together in the three main galleries of this dedicated museum. The
museum shows MADI art in their permanent collection in the high-ceilinged imposing
entry way. If you’re on the mailing list you’ll receive announcements of changing
exhibitions.  

Familiar names in the show include Robert McCan represented by William Campbell
Contemporary in Fort Worth, Rusty Scruby remembered for his retrospective at the
MAC, and Ron Anderson head of the art department at T.C.U. in Fort Worth. Since this
is a large varied group, only a few representational works are illustrated - all the more
excuse to get over to 3109 Carlisle Street.
Ron Watson, "Exordium," 2006
Madi Museum & Gallery
3109 Carlisle Street
Dallas, TX 75204-1194
214.855.7802
www.madimuseum.org
Rusty Scruby
MADI, a movement featuring non-
figurative art originated in Buenos
Aires in 1946 but it isn’t limited to
South America. For instance, artists
took the style up in the Netherlands,
Russia and Japan. Since the 60s
Hungarian Op artist Victor Vasarely
(1906-1997) inspires MADI-type artists
because the way his art transformed
the flat surface marking a world of
unending possibilities foreshadowing
a new global reality shaped by
computer programming and the
Internet.    

A great contemporaneous museum
exhibition coming up is
“Constructivist Spirit: Abstract Art in
South and North America, 1920s-50s,”
at the Amon Carter Museum in Fort
Worth, June 26 through
September 25.    
Tim Botts

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