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moderndallas.net
Special “Eye” to Watch
June Mattingly // contributing art writer

“Re-Seeing the Contemporary:
Selected  from the Collection”
represents 60 paintings, sculptures and
works on paper at the Dallas Museum of Art
through March 20

This exhibition features works from the richly acclaimed DMA permanent collection of
modern and contemporary plus first-time-shown loans from Dallas collections
“in a dynamic new context.”
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While this exhibition is on view, works will be rotated in and out of the galleries in order to
show the extent of the contemporary collection, one of the cornerstones of the DMA and
why this museum is considered to own one of the most important contemporary
collections in the US.  
“Re-seeing the Contemporary” celebrates the rich holdings that form this international
collection by featuring current master works by living artists such as Richard Tuttle and
Robert Mangold along with modern masterpieces by artists no longer with us such as
Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko.

Pyramid (Square Plan), 1959 (destroyed); 1970 (remade)
Carl Andre, American Wood (fir)
Overall: 68 7/8 x 31 x 31 in. (1 m 74.96 cm x 78.74 cm x 78.74 cm)    
Jackson Pollock, “Portrait and a Dream” 1953, oil on canvas, 58 1/2 x 134 3/4 inches
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Algur H. Meadows
Morris Louis, “Delta Kappa,” 1960, acrylic on canvas, 103 1/2 x 146 inches
Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection
Dr. Jeffrey Grove, Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, the organizer of the exhibition,
explains works are installed “in a roughly chronological sequence with each gallery
encompassing either a span of time, reflecting select movements, or exploring ideas
expressed in radically different ways over many decades.” Jeffrey was formerly Senior
Curator of Contemporary Art for the High Museum in Atlanta.
David Smith “Cubi XVII,” 1963, polished
stainless steel, overall:
107 3/4 x 64 3/8 x 38 1/8 inches
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of
Eugene and Margaret McDermott
Maroon Blue Egg, 1986
Richard Tuttle, American
Aluminum, Homasote, plastic board,
aluminum tubing, paper, wire, hot glue,
acrylic, powdered pigments, silver spray
enamels
Overall: 24 x 15 x 5 in. (60.96 x 38.1 x 12.7
cm.) Dallas Museum of Art, anonymous gift
The exhibit fills four first floor galleries and the adjoining the Barrel Vault. The Barrel Vault
focuses on phases of abstract expressionism from the 1940s with works by Mark Rothko,
Morris Louis and Franz Kline through the present represented by living Texas artist Susie
Rosmarin. The art in the Stoffel Gallery covers the early 1960s conceptual works by
Joseph Kosuth and Ed Kienholz while the Hanley Gallery’s art moves onto 1970s
artists who exploited a reductive visual vocabulary as seen in works by Carl Andre
and Larry Bell.  The Lamont Gallery concentrates on the 1980s to 90s when artists
departed from traditional painting and sculpture in the hands of artists such as
Peter Halley; while selections from the most recent decades in the Rachofsky
Gallery focus on ideas of figurative representation and includes two Texas artists,
Christian Schumann and Ludwig Schwarz. The exhibit fills four first floor galleries
and the adjoining the Barrel Vault. The Barrel Vault focuses on phases of abstract
expressionism from the 1940s with works by Mark Rothko, Morris Louis and Franz
Kline through the present represented by living Texas artist Susie Rosmarin. The
art in the Stoffel Gallery covers the early 1960s conceptual works by Joseph
Kosuth and Ed Kienholz while the Hanley Gallery’s art moves onto 1970s artists
who exploited a reductive visual vocabulary as seen in works by Carl Andre and
Larry Bell. The Lamont Gallery concentrates on the 1980s to 90s when artists
departed from traditional painting and sculpture in the hands of artists such
as Peter Halley; while selections from the most recent decades in the
Rachofsky Gallery focus on ideas of figurative representation.
Brice Marden “To Corfu,” 1976, oil and
wax on canvas, 84 x 72 1/2 inches
Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the
Arts Collection
Dallas Museum of Art, General
Acquisitions Fund and matching funds
from The 500, Inc.
Franz Kline, Slate Cross, 1961, oil on
canvas,111 1/4 x 79 1/4 in.
Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs.
Algur H. Meadows
Art Verbiage for Today:
Abstract
is often equated with the term modern since the modernist trend has
been toward the abstract; Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali, Georgia O’Keefe and early
Richard Diebenkorns represent just a few exceptions.  

Russian-born Wassily Kandinsky in Munich (Marcel Breuer and Kandinsky later served
together as Bauhaus faculty) was the strongest pioneer of pure abstraction between
1910 and 1913. The Russian Constructivist Vladmir Tatlin was the first to create three-
dimensional abstractions. To date, an unbelievable amount of abstract art has been
produced in styles the strongest of which is Minimalist Art during the 1960s and 70s.